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CSPAN 14
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COM 5
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English 122
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 122 (some duplicates have been removed)
PBS
Oct 4, 2012 11:00pm PDT
very much, it is a pleasure. >> you have been involved in computer science most of your adult left. >> i have a ph.d. >> rose: yes. that qualifies you. how did you get invved in this, though, the technology of voting? >> well, in 2003, a colleague of mine, david dill, a professor at stanford discovered that silicon centrally, santa clara county was about to buy voting machines to be used there and several of us were just astounded because as computer scientists we know that the computers and the voting machines can have software bugs or even hidden malicious code so we got involved. >> rose: as all computers. >> like all computers, exactly and so we got involved, with trying to stop this purchase, in silicon valley and right in the heart of silicon valley and we didn't succeed. >> rose: you could not change the direction. >> we lost three to two. the election officials wanted to believe the vendors over us because the vendors assured them everything is safe. >> rose: and there was your appointment to the international workshop on international voting president clinton, this book ki
CSPAN
Oct 8, 2012 12:00pm EDT
science on earth. and this is an odd kind of expedition for another reason. usually scientists go off in different directions, different times using their own tools. for mer the entire team was all together. 150 scientists and engineers balancing together, as it were, like on a huge skateboard creeping over the sand, up the down and hills and craters meters at a time for eight years. so it's something like being on a ship, on an early voyageover discovery. the scientists and the sailing crew were all having to travel together. they had to negotiate how long are we going to stay here in where are we going to go next in and what should we do at each site? and this requires a well coordinated understanding of their roles, schedules, resources, long-term plans and a clear chain of command. if you visited the science and engineering coordination meeting during the prime mission, which was the first 90 days of landing on mars in 2004, same thing we're going through now with curiosity during these 90 days, you could see the scientists up front on the bridge, as it were, with huge displays of
MSNBC
Oct 9, 2012 2:00pm PDT
, the rogue's gallery of republicans who don't believe science. wait until you catch this science committee in the house and it's membership. this is "hardball," the place for politics. well, if it isn't mr. margin. mr. margin? don't be modest, bob. you found a better way to pack a bowling ball. that was ups. and who called ups? you did, bob. i just asked a question. it takes a long time to pack a bowling ball. the last guy pitched more ball packers. but you... you consulted ups. you found a better way. that's logistics. that's margin. find out what else ups knows. i'll do that. you're on a roll. that's funny. i wasn't being funny, bob. i know. and his new boss told him two things -- cook what you love, and save your money. joe doesn't know it yet, but he'll work his way up from busser to waiter to chef before opening a restaurant specializing in fish and game from the great northwest. he'll start investing early, he'll find some good people to help guide him, and he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td amerit
CSPAN
Oct 8, 2012 8:30am EDT
in education. you see more young men majoring in math and science and more young women majoring in actually gender studies, literature, fields that are not going to pay as well as math and science. then when they enter the workplace you see more women going into nonprofits. you see more women working shorter hours and you see more men and investment banks and computer science. there isn't any reason that these two groups should be paid the same if they make different choices. a man an and a woman in an investment bank, face both start at goldman sachs, those should be paid to sing. they are paid the same. if they are not there are avenues to pursue, but that's a big difference. >> what you think about the white house council on women and girls? >> well, i think the white house needs have a council on men and boys. you can see that young men have lower earnings than young women. if you look at single men and single women in urban areas, then the single men have lower earnings. you can see that there are far higher rates of voice dropping out of high school than girls. boys are getting less e
CNN
Oct 9, 2012 5:00pm PDT
's not an exact science, it's a snapshot in time. we will see if governor romney can sustain this bounce. the president got one ahead of his convention. it dissipated. romney got one out of the first debate. we'll see if it lasts. this science is not exact but it's pretty darned good. if you look back over time, it's pretty darned good. when you see the conspiracy theories you have to say it's the politics of the moment. every now and then you see a poll that you say well, that doesn't look right. i look at ours every time before we put them on the air and the guys who do it for us do it just right. >> go ahead, gloria. >> anderson, i also think it actually kind of affects the campaign in its own way because as the old saying goes, nothing sticks to you like success so when you have a candidate like mitt romney who has been down, maybe some of his voters are less enthusiastic because they think oh, he might not win. suddenly, he's got the wind at his back. suddenly they're thinking gosh, maybe this guy can win, maybe i ought to turn out and vote. then his base might become more enthusias
MSNBC
Oct 9, 2012 4:00pm PDT
't believe science. wait until you catch this science committee in the house and its membership. this is "hardball," the place for politics. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 let's talk about low-cost investing. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 at schwab, we're committed to offering you tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 low-cost investment options-- tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 like our exchange traded funds, or etfs tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 which now have the lowest tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 operating expenses tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 in their respective tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 lipper categories. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 lower than spdr tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and even lower than vanguard. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 that means with schwab, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 your portfolio has tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 a better chance to grow. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and you can trade all our etfs online, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 commission-free, from your schwab account. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 so let's talk about saving money, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 with schwab etfs. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 schwab etfs now have the lowest
PBS
Oct 3, 2012 12:00am PDT
is in decline. researchers at the australian institute of marine science say the reef has lost half of its coral cover over the past 27 years. there are multiple causes, including a destructive kind of starfish shown here. we look at what's behind it and what's at stake-- in australia and around the world-- with nancy knowlton, a coral reef biologist and a chair of marine science at the smithsonian national museum of natural history here in washington. welcome. >> thanks. how has all of this coral died off? do we know what's causing it? is it all that... >> it's not all the star fish. the star fish is about 42%. typhoons, big strong storms another 48% and then coral bleaching is the remaining 10% which is caused whenever the water gets too hot. >> ifill: so this is human causedded? >> yes. most of it is human caused. i mean a coral reef naturally goes through cycles of up and down. but it shouldn't be declining by half over course of 27 years. >> ifill: i feel like we have talked before about the declining coral cover. but not... but i'm wondering whether it's now picking up speed or whether thi
NBC
Oct 8, 2012 6:30pm EDT
science correspondent, robert bazell. >> reporter: for the first time ever, an experimental drug is showing great promise of slowing the alzheimer's disease. >> this is the first time we are seeing a slowing of the cognitive decline in patients with alzheimer's disease in this type of drug treatment. >> reporter: at first, the experiment experimental drug seemed to fail as has every experimental drug to date. but when the manufacturer looked at it more closely, it found those with more mild disease had a less memory loss than those with the placebo, the 71-year-old retired expert still functions well. >> there are things that take a lot longer than they used to because i keep forgetting the order in which things have to be done. >> reporter: the results presented today combined studies with a total of 2,000 patients in the last two months. most scientists say it wouldn't be enough to reach the fda approval. but further studies show that it could help people with early alzheimer's disease. the drug is certainly not the cure that everybody wants, but for al krieger and millions wit
Current
Oct 8, 2012 6:00am PDT
♪] >> and he is the head of the committee on science. >> stephanie: yeah, you sometimes think it's an onion headline. brown respect of georgia. all of the stuff i was taught about evolution, the big bang is theory, all of that is lies straight from the pit of hell and it's lies to try to keep me and all of the folks that were taught right by thinking they need a savior. this is the man in 2007 who said he didn't believe president obama is an american citizen. and i bet he is a job truther as well. >> yeah, they would have quotation marks around science. >> stephanie: yeah. david, good morning. >> caller: i saw something great the other day on randi rhodes one of her things on facebook. hey, mitt today's sesame street is brought to you by the number 7.8. [ laughter ] >> caller: if we're going to massage the numbers, why don't make it 5.5. >> great point. >> caller: thank you. >> stephanie: the number 7.8, brought to you by the letters f u. rude pundit has some great stuff on all of this as we continue on the "stephanie miller show." ♪ p in congress. it won't do anything fo
CNN
Oct 9, 2012 8:00am PDT
an idea of how massive this balloon is. as far as the science, ashleigh, yes, what they're trying to see is just what the human body does when it travels the speed of sound. if the speed of sound has any affect on the body when it's just traveling in a spacesuit, that's never been done before. felix baum na felix baumgartner is about to do this. another thing they will mesh is how this high pressure suit holds up. if it does hold up and is not compromised in any way, this could be the next generation of spacesuit. those are the technological advances they hope to be able to make here with this mission. you know, just a few months ago i talked to felix baumgartner about this and with all of its inherent risks, and there are many, i asked him a key question, is he afraid of dying on this mission. take a listen. >> well, dying has always been part of my life. as a bait jumper you always face death on every base jump and so it's important you do your homework because you need confidence. you have to have confidence in your team and your skills and yourself and you always hope that you're not
Comedy Central
Oct 2, 2012 11:00pm PDT
's your move. >> jon: next time on "herman cain, an american presidency," science. >> herman cain ain't no clone. (laughter) >> john oliver,ll >> jon: welcome back! my guest tonight, his new movie is called "taken 2." >> where's mom? >> she's fine. she's not far. >>s where she? >> come on, kim, move! >> where are we going? >> we have to go to the embassy. >> i'm not sure i can. >> you know how to shoot? >> no. >> then drive. >>>> that's why you should take the subway. (laughter) please welcome back to the program liam neeson. (cheers and applause) how you been? >> thank you. congratulations. >> jon: thank you. oh, the emmy thing? very kind of you to say. a gentleman in the audience tonight wanted to know why i didn't receive an emmy for my work on "the faculty." (laughter) which is the wrong question on so many different levels. (laughter) that -- that was the kind of thing "taken 2" what type of awards do you think -- are there awards for kicking so much ass in a movie? (laughter) the assies, maybe? >> there's an idea. >> jon: what did they take this time? the last time they took you
FOX
Oct 9, 2012 12:00pm PDT
-- nobel prize in physics. he is originally from sacramento and received a bachelor of science from uc berkeley. he's now a physicist at the university of colorado in boulder. both judges credit them for inventing ground-breaking methods to observe the properties of quantum parols while preserving their quantum properties. >>> ahead closer look at why investors are feeling down on wall street. >>> and what happened late this morning for an amazing jump from the edge of space. >>> stocks are down after global economic growth and poor expectations for corporate earnings seasons with kicks off after the closing bell. dow down 98, nasdaq down 45, s&p down 12. >>> high winds today derailed plans for an man to launch a death defying 23-mile free fall in new mexico. former military parachutist baumgartner is on a quest to become the first sky diver to break the sound barrier. he planned to ride a capsule carried bay balloon into the stats fear then jump. but the balloon is so delicate it can only take flight of winds of two miles an hour or less. the 43-year-old now says he will try again. >>
CNBC
Oct 8, 2012 6:00am EDT
. another standout stock, gilead sciences is up 70% year-to-date, ubs has it as its top large tech biotech pick, it's attractively trading to a discount to the biotech sector, biogen up 50% in the past year thanks to its strong earnings performance and anticipation riding behind its multiple sclerosis drug bg12 which could get approval by year's end. another is buyout speculation. the firms are on the hunt for under the radar biotech firms, bristol-myers among others making big bets. andrew you've been following that as well. >> thank you for that report. lot of beta. see if there's any alpha. >>> in the next hour of "squawk box" former ubs american chairman robert wolf will join us to talk financials, jobs and the election, mr. obama's favorite banker. and later health care, a major issue for americans in the presidential candidates, the coo of mt. sinai, ken david, is going to join us. a crash management system and the world's only tridion safety cell which can withstand over three and a half tons. small in size. big on safety. which can withstand over three and a half tons. if we want t
CNN
Oct 9, 2012 2:00am PDT
from poll to poll. there's no science to this. polls will differ on that number, depending on what they're finding in the field and it will drive you crazy to dig deep into the poll and say this one has more democrats, this one has more republicans. look at the trends over time. we have two polls. we want ten polls off this debate, we want to know where the race really is. all we have is gallup and pew. it's showing a huge bump up for romney. all these polls have a house effect. over time they all show in the course of 2012 a little bit of an advantage for one candidate or another. rasmussen very often shows a pro-republican house effect. pew has very often shown a pro-obama effect. it makes this huge romney lead even more surprising. wait for a week's worth of polls and we'll see where the race stands. as you point out, this is the best news romney has had since before his convention. >> does this couldn't as an october surprise. >> usually october surprises is some outside event that changes the election or something -- some conspiracy that a campaign polls at the last second to advan
FOX Business
Oct 8, 2012 1:00pm EDT
first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> market is down 30 points. we were talking to david kotok at beginning of show how many investors got out of the market. what is mistake it is because stocks are up 9%. >> people looking at true fundamentals true health of the global economy can't really deny that, tracy. melissa: that is the juice market is running. tracy: you guys talked a lot about it. a lot of hedge funds closed up shop on september 30th, called it a day and wrapped it up with a nice little bow. we'll see what happens with the fiscal cliff. >> what did you do with ashley? tracy: he is home with his mama. i'm tracy byrnes, ashley will be back on wednesday. american companies beware. the house intelligence committee says doing business with two chinese telecom firms actually threatens our national security. >>> gas prices soaring once again in california. the state points the finger at refinery supply problems but we'll tell you why california's own regulations are really to blame. >>> just 29 days to go before t
FOX
Oct 3, 2012 7:00am EDT
will be developed by a school teacher? >> yes. there's an entire line of science toys, encouraging girls to get involved in science. there's journals, online, interactivity way to get kids hooked on science. >> reporter: this comes from the d.c. area. word around. >> this is a travel game you can take with you. for older kids and adults. moves quick. it's a lot of fun. >> reporter: now let's talk about younger kids. >> this is an active game. based on disney fairies. you put them around the house. girls will pull one of these out of the bag. when you get to fairy, you run around the house and try to grab as many as you can. they're up and active. this is green toys, made of 100% recycled plastic. it's waterproof so kids can take it in the bath. not only can you control the car, you can play music now. i have all my songs downloaded on itunes. then i can open up the doors of the car and the car becomes a speaker. >> reporter: blue tooth from the device to the vehicle? >> yeah. you can drive it, may your music and it's kind of fun. >> reporter: really by moving the ipad around will steer the car.
CNN
Oct 2, 2012 8:00am PDT
, first of all, the kind of science that you do for a living. you basically find out what we as people can handle when it comes to drama and exposure to these kind of horrifying, you know, events. there were crash test dummies in a lot of these seats. they were very expensive, weren't they? >> there are, about $150,000 uninstrumented. the data acquisition system needed to collect the data, all of that. we had probably at least, probably about 500,000 plus worth of instrumentation on that plane. >> you wanted to know every single ounce of data. every single knee that would get skinned on an airplane. >> exactly. because this isn't something we do every day. >> '84 was the last time you did it. >> we wanted to collect as much information as possible. and that was what was great about discovery. they allowed us to do that. they viewed this as a science experiment. >> now everybody wants to know where should i sit on an airplane? we've all heard the lore you'll die if you're in first class, you're better to be in the middle, no, the tail, then you see all of these different kind of crashes. >>
MSNBC
Oct 2, 2012 11:00am PDT
references 100,000 new math and science teachers as well as additional manufacturing jobs in this country. they point out during his second term, how do you break the fever or the part zan fever in washington. many democrats dismiss saying mitch mcconnell and others said they would never work with in it president from the day of inauguration. how does he put people back to work and at those jobs that he pointed out in that ad? >> i think he has to lay out exactly what he believes needs to happen in order for these jobs to be created. the one thing about debates -- >> what does he say, then? >> i think he needs to say specifically what type of policies he can push through congress. >> what would those policies be? you're an inside man and know a lot what's going on that the average voter do not. what are the policies? >> the job bills he's proposed and infrastructure spending he's proposed, additional educational spends that he's proposed held up in congress. now the challenge here is the moderator will push both candidates. jim lair is a good moderator. he's very balanced, and i don't thi
MSNBC
Oct 9, 2012 8:00am PDT
science professor samuel popkin, author of "the candidate: what it takes to win and hold the white house." he's been a democratic presidential campaign adviser since 1972, working with george mcgovern, jimmy carter, bill clinton and al gore. professor, great to have you hire. let's start with thursday's vice presidential debate. what does joe biden and paul ryan have to do to outdo each other, to win? >> well, the job is not to be gladiators, because it doesn't matter which of them is better in a cage fight. the question is what can they do to strengthen the way people approach the presidential debate. biden has to find a way to put romney on the spot, not ryan on the spot. >> andrew sullivan has a new article on the daily beast website called "did president obama just throw the entire election away?" and he writes in part, "i've never seen a candidate self-destruct for no external reason this late in the campaign before. i'm trying to see a silver lining, but when a president self-imlates on live tv and his opponent shines with lies and smiles and a record number of people watch, it's h
WHUT
Oct 4, 2012 6:00pm EDT
to finance the transcontinental railroad, let's start the national academy of sciences, let's start land grant colleges, because we want to give these gateways of opportunity for all americans, because if all americans are getting opportunity, were all one of the better off. that doesn't restrict people's freedom, but enhances it. what i have tried to do as president is to apply those same principles. and when it comes to education, what i've said is we've got to reform schools that are not working. we something called race to the top. we've said, we will give you more money if you initiate reforms. as a consequence, had 46 states around the country have made a real difference. but what i've also said is, let's hire another 100,000 math and science teachers to make sure we maintain our technological lead and our people are skilled and able to succeed. and hard-pressed states right now cannot all do that. in fact, we've seen layoffs of hundreds of thousands of teachers over the last several years, and governor romney doesn't think any more teachers. i do, because i think that is the kind
ABC
Oct 3, 2012 2:35am EDT
to come, cheeseburgers, fries, milk shakes in the name of science. >> why people are loading up on the fast food and getting paid amazing money to do it. it is all coming up. ♪ cheeseburger in paradise ♪ heaven on earth ♪ >> the next story either seems like a dream come true or a disaster waiting to happen. eating fast food, every day, and getting paid thousands to do it. >> big money here. all a new experiment conducted by doctors to measure exactly what fast food diets can do to you. abc's john donvan has the story. >> reporter: hitting the fast food drive-in for science. >> can i get five soft tacos. two sausage burritos. >> reporter: over and over and over again. it has been dave's life the past three months or so as has been eating the food. a precisely measured, 1,000 calories a day, extra meal daily, fast food only. >> how many calories? >> 770. >> reporter: why? this man is paying them to. dr. samuel klein a researcher at washington medical school in st. louis trying to understand why weight gain ladies to diseases like diabetes and hypertension and how that relate
CSPAN
Oct 4, 2012 6:00am EDT
does. a lot of people in here, remember the question in political science 101, should be elected representative do what he believes is right or what constituents because right? you could answer the question one way or the other. the important thing to take with them it is -- [inaudible] nobody wants to run for office so they can -- a robot into the you what to be a candidate because you believe in something. whatever you want to do. nobody wants you to just pull the lever for what the constituents you to do. so all a super pac and would do is identify places where the elected representative has gone too far from his constituency, and then educate the electorate about how the elected representative is sideways with the public opinion and the people. so you take that crossroads add, we're running it in all the states talk about the president has had this tennis program. testing this thing was wildly unpopular, and all the ads is hold the president or another elected official to account for what they did. it can't change public opinion about the stimulus legislation that we can iden
CSPAN
Oct 5, 2012 10:30pm EDT
of a books will look at science history, the cyberworld, popular culture, live at noon eastern on book tv on c-span 2. >> the bureau of labor statistics has announced the unemployment rate has dropped from 8.1% to 7.8% in september, the lowest level since january 2009. president obama spoken by the job picture at this venue at george mason university. it is about 30 minutes. >> hello, everybody! [cheers and applause] hello, george mason! hello, patriots! [cheers and applause] good to see you guys. thank you. thank you. [cheers and applause] thank you! thank you. thank you so much. thank you. [cheers and applause] thank you. everybody, have a seat. have a seat. thank you. well, it is good to be here. i am so proud to have katherine's support. can you give her a big round of applause for that great introduction. [applause] it's also good to know that we've got the former governor and next united states senator from the commonwealth of virginia, tim kaine! and your congressman, jerry conley. [cheers] and good to see all of you. so one month. just one month from tomorrow, virginia, you're goi
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 122 (some duplicates have been removed)